Orphan Barrel Entrapment

en·trap·ment
inˈtrapmənt,enˈtrapmənt/
noun
noun: entrapment; plural noun: entrapments
  1. the state of being caught in or as in a trap.
    “the feeling of entrapment grows as the roads close and the power goes out”
    • the action of tricking someone into committing a crime in order to secure their prosecution.
      “his style of investigation constitutes entrapment”

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The title of the bottle pretty much tells you everything you need to know… you are basically being tricked into buying this because it has a big 25 on it.  Despite the fact that we know we are being entrapped by Diageo, we still overpay for the bottle anyway… on to the review:

Diageo’s Orphan Barrel Entrapment is the newest release and is a 25yr Canadian Rye from most likely Gimli, but could be Waterloo given they were distilling up to 1992  (Update: I have read online that it is in fact from Gimli).  They had admitted it is Crown Royal and decided to release it in this line instead of a special Crown Royal release or blend it into their normal product.

Extremely light colored. If it were Bourbon I’d guess it was six months old but it’s 25yrs old aged in used wood. The wood is probably so used there is nothing left to be absorbed into the distillate—I doubt the barrels were even reconditioned or recharred.

The nose is classic Canadian Rye, and that’s because it is. It’s Crown Royal and it’s smells just like their low end brand. Vanilla, Christmas tree and candy corn. Doesn’t smell like it’s been aged a lot. Reminds me a lot of older Canadian Club dusties that are easy to find, cheap and enjoyable.

The initial flavor is quite nice, smooth, sweet with vanilla and sugar candy and goes down easily. However there is no friendly heat, the mouthfeel is as thin as it can get and the finish ends before you know it. The taste is enjoyable but not complex.

Unlike some previous Orphan Barrel releases, this is totally drinkable. However it drinks well for a $40 bottle, not a MSRP $150 (I actually paid $199.99 plus tax because that was the only place around me that had it). I have several 70’s and 80’s dusty Canadian Clubs that taste better and I got for significantly cheaper. Prices affect ratings and this one is definitely not one you need to get but if you can find a pour for a reasonable price, maybe worth trying one glass.  DO NOT PAY UP ON SECONDARY FOR THIS! 86/100

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Michter’s Toasted Barrel Finish Rye NEW RELEASE

The newest release from Michter’s, the Toasted Barrel Finish Kentucky Straight Rye Whiskey. I’m seeing a lot of hype on twitter on this one in addition to very high secondary prices. I found this on the very bottom shelf (ironically) of a local store for $79.99, as I wasn’t going to chase it.

Nice golden color, the toasted finish really added a nice color.

When I first opened it the smell was pretty bad but after a few hours it opened up. Candy corn, toasted cinnamon raisin bread, bubble gum and walnuts on the nose.

For 108 proof it’s pretty easy to drink. The mouthfeel is good but not great. The taste is enjoyable. The finish is long and continues nice flavors with limited bitterness. This is a really nice rye.

Is this a whiskey worth chasing and paying 2x or more on the secondary market? Definitely not. If you find it at retail for $79.99 should you buy it? Yes. If you like ryes like I do it’s worth adding to your cabinet, but I would stock up on your bunker. For the price, Pikesville is still the best out there, and for the high end stuff, nothing has yet to be able to touch Handy. Solid juice from Michters, would have preferred to see it at 125 proof though. 92/100.

P.S. I have a couple extra, so if anyone is looking to trade, please DM me @newbourbondrink

 

 

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Lock Stock & Barrel 16yr Straight Rye Whiskey

I tried the Lock Stock & Barrel 13yr rye last year at a bar and really liked it.  I didn’t review it, but it was definitely a 90+ rating.  When I saw this on the shelf, three more years of age, I jumped on it.  I did some online due diligence and even though this has been aged in new charred oak American barrels (according the the bottle), it apparently is a sourced Canadian whiskey of 100% rye grain mash bill.  107 proof.

The color is an extremely inviting golden amber shimmering whiskey.

There is a sweetness on the nose, crushed rock candy, necco wafers, apple tart, and vanilla.  The nose is not particularly strong though, as I really had to put my nose in there to get the aromas.

The palate is good, medium tannins but low on the coating oils.  The flavors are ok, but not particularly strong and the finish is on the weaker side.

Although I did not give the 13yr a proper review, from what I remember, I enjoyed that one quite a bit better.  For the $150 MSRP, this one is not one I can recommend.  I always compare ryes to Pikesville and I’d much rather have three of those than one of these.  85/100.

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Widow Jane Whiskey Distilled from Rye Mash: BOLD FACED LIARS

I have to say, this is one of the least attractive bottles I’ve ever seen.  Don’t judge a book by its cover…. they say, and because I’ve never tried anything from Widow Jane, let us just hope that the worst part is the visual.  The liquid in the bottle is super hazy, with weird clouds of nebulous clumps floating around, in addition to a touch of charcoal dust at the bottom–I really do like the dust.  There is a sticker they attached to the top of the bottle that says: “new technique, blah blah blah.”  Here is where I have a problem. This sticker, is a bold faced lie.  They claim they have a new technique of non-chill filtering that causes this issue?  No.  This is a very old issue that every distillery encounters.  Distillers that choose to proof their whiskey down well below 100 proof (this one is 91), are faced with cloudiness in their bourbon due to the way water interacts with the liquid.  So if a distillery wants to non-chill filter (which I’m so glad so many do!) they usually sell it at a cask strength, or at least a bottled-in-bond style.  At this proof, the liquid is clear and beautiful.  Once you get to 91, it clouds up so you would have to chill filter to remove those elements to make it look attractive.  So again, saying that it is a new technique, is just a bold faced lie.  The question is whether or not, even with the weird asthetic choice, proofing down a non-chill filtered young rye whiskey to 91 proof is the right decision from a taste perspective.  I’m willing to forgive the ugliness of the rye if the taste makes up for it.

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Spoiler Alert… it didn’t.  The nose is moderately hot, medicinal, soapy, full of cough syrup, menthol, with hints of rock candy, eucaliptis and mint.  Not particularly inviting at all.

The taste echoes the nose with heat first and foremost, with unexciting flavors that go into a short finish dominated by more heat.  The mouthfeel is the other redeeming aspect of this rye which is due to the non-chill filtered, as you get some nice grippy tannins.  Unfortunately this doesn’t salvage the dram.

I did a little research online and here is what I think happened…  No where on this bottle does it mention where this whiskey was distilled (is that still legal in this day and age?), and I heard they source it from somewhere in Kentucky.  My bet is that this is barely two years old from the new Willett rye production.  They ship it up to Brooklyn, and no, not everything is cooler and better in Brooklyn.  They probably move it into different barrels they had in the distillery so they can say they finished it in New York.  Then they bring a few barrels of water from their eponymous source upstate, and use it to proof down.  They probably wanted to bottle this at 100 or higher proof, but the heat is so bad, and they didn’t feel like waiting for the rye to mellow, that they felt they had to release it at the lower proof.  Putting a sticker at the top of a label in certain states is legal, not requiring TTB approval, so they stuck it on after the fact once they realized that it wasn’t selling because of the cloudiness.  These are all educated guesses, but I’m willing to bet that they are pretty close to the truth.  Ultimately, Widow Jane should be embarrassed to put this product out with a label that is a lie, and with a product that isn’t very good.  I’m relieved to say that I didn’t buy this bottle, instead my wife received it as a work gift from one of the law firms that her firm works with.  I guess they don’t care too much about her business, otherwise they wouldn’t have sent such a shit gift.  I can’t believe anyone would pay anything for this awful “craft” whiskey, let alone the $50 MSRP.  73/100

Canadian Club 20yr: LCBO Pickup

I rated a different 20yr Canadian Rye a couple days ago, (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/ninety-decades-of-richness-20-canadian-rye-whisky/) and this was the other bottle I bought from the LCBO.  This is a “Limited Edition” yet my bottle was number 301,802… so I’m not sure if by limited they mean less than a million bottles?  That’s not particularly limited to me… but what do I know?   Anyway, on to the review…

CC20 is a 80 proof Canadian Rye whiskey, which a dark amber color.  Much darker than the Nintey Rye I tasted a couple days ago, even though it had a higher proof.  The nose has mint, menthol, eucalyptus, graham crackers, and vanilla with medium heat.

Even though this is only 80 proof, there is a decent balance here with the spices, flavors and just enough heat to make it enjoyable.  There is a very smooth sweetness on it, that brings out the best of the Canadian Club, but with overlays of just enough complexity to make it a sipper rather than a mixer.  The finish is moderate, but the mouthfeel is lacking due to the low proof and chil filtering.

This one certainly is better than the Nintey rye from the other day, but one wonders what could have been if it was bottled at 120 proof instead of 80 without any chill filtering.  This could have been a really amazing rye if that was the case.  But in classic Canadian fashion, they water it down and screw it up.  Sorry, eh?  86/100.

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Ninety: Decades of Richness 20 Canadian Rye Whisky

I picked this bottle up at the LCBO the last time I was in Toronto.  Ninety proof, 20yr Canadian rye whisky: what’s not to like?  And it was pretty cheap, I don’t remember the exact price, but converted back to USD, it ended up being around $40-50 or so.  Hard to find anything 20yrs that cheap.  And it said “Ultra Premium” on the bottle, ooooooooohhh… on to the review.

The color is pretty pale, not unexpected for Canadian whisky which typically uses multiple time used bourbon barrels.  The nose is light with stone fruit, baked apples, allspice, vanilla, Necco wafers and baked bread.  Very little heat and the nose is subtle.

The taste is enjoyable, getting flavors from the nose, but the finish isn’t very long and it’s not terribly complex.  There is some light heat on the chest which is good, but the chill filtering takes out most of the mouthfeel leaving me with a thin finish.

Is this worth $50?  Probably.  But would I buy it again?  No.  It’s good, but for a 20yr old rye, I just expected more.  Pikesville Rye, which is only 6yrs old, blows this away from every possible perspective.  I’m going to review the Canadian Club 20 in the next day or so, we’ll see which is better.  This one is an 83/100.

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Top 5 Drams of the Year 2016

Another year gone by and I’ve read so many negative stories, yet, there were some pretty awesome bourbons released this year.  Overall the prices have gone up, but you can still find bargains and making friends with your local retailer has never been more important… onto the list!

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#1 2016’s Buffalo Trace Thomas H Handy 126.2 proof 97.5/100  secondary price: $300 (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/btac-thomas-h-handy-2016/)  This was my favorite of the BTAC releases, with a close second being GTS, but THH is far easier to get your hands on and better price giving it the edge.  Handy may be the BTAC that is least respected, but time and time again it is my favorite release.

#2 2016 Release Four Roses Elliott’s Select OESK 52.9% abv 91/100 secondary price $225 (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/08/15/four-roses-elliotts-select/)  There was a lot of worry when Jim Rutledge retired from Four Roses, but when Brent Elliott came out with this bottle immediately afterwards, all fears were assuaged.  In fact, this bottle was substantially better than the 2016 Four Roses Small Batch Limited Edition release, although not quite as good as last year’s winner, the 2015 FRSBLE.  I think we can all sleep soundly knowing that Four Roses is in good hands.

3# Barrell Bourbon New Years 2017 retail price $99.99 (for now!) (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2017/01/02/happy-new-year-barrell-bourbon-2017/)  Another top award for this up and comer.  This is their first true marriage release of 4 different barrels from Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee, and once again blows the competition away.  Grab a few while you still can as the first release of this bad boy probably will be worth a lot of money in the near future…. keep your eye

#4 Willett Family Estate Single Barrel Bourbon #438 119.8 proof 96/100 $120 @ gift shop (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/01/27/willett-family-estate-single-barrel-bourbon-438-holy-moley/)  This was one of the bottles I was lucky enough to buy when I visited Willett in January of 2016.  This was a honey barrel if I’ve ever tasted one.  If you are ever able to get some of this, don’t hesitate!

#5 Garrison Brothers Single Barrel Bourbon #3824 97 proof 96/100 $100 retail price (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/go-visit-garrison-brothers-single-barrel-amazing/) Garrison Brothers consistently puts out a great product.  I also visited their distillery this year and really enjoyed meeting Dan and the team.  Very excited to see the 2017 Cowboy Bourbon when it is released next year!

There were so many that almost made the cut… I tried a couple rums this year that were really good including one from Balcones (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/balcones-texas-rum-special-release-batch-15-1-63-9-abv/) and another from Barrell (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/12/03/barrell-rum-batch-001-7yr-jamaican-pot-still-rum/).  Barrell’s Whiskey 002 was another one that almost made the cut, but after careful consideration I preferred the New Years (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/04/24/barrell-whiskey-002-magical-sherry-cask-finish/).  Most lists have Booker’s Rye on their top 5, and although it is a good whiskey, it’s just too hot and expensive and does not deserve to make it in my very humble opinion (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/08/23/bookers-rye/).  PHC 10yr was also hotly debated, and I thought it was extremely good, but given the price, just not quite worthy vs the Garrison or the WFE (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/09/19/phc10-parkers-heritage-collection-10-24yr-bourbon/).

I’ll have my top five disappointments in the world of bourbon coming up soon… thanks again for a great 2016 to everyone who reads this blog.  Readership has gone up 5x and I hope to continue that trend into 2017.  I’d love to hear what your top 5 of the year were?  Happy New Year!

http://www.barrellbourbon.com/  http://www.garrisonbros.com/  http://www.kentuckybourbonwhiskey.com/  http://fourrosesbourbon.com/  https://www.buffalotracedistillery.com/