Jack Rose 3: Willett side by side

Willett 23yr Bourbon B78 black wax capsule 136.2 proof:
Dark golden hue. Big nose,  but not up the middle, it surrounds and envelopes with charcoal, French toast, butter and s’mores. Wow. This is what bourbon is supposed to taste like. It’s huge, but not too hot given the proof.  The mouthfeel is awesome, clearly not chill filtered. The finish just goes on and on. This is a three minute+ bourbon. All the flavors from the nose are on the palate and they don’t dissipate at all. If this was all I could drink for the rest of my life I would be ok with that. 97.5/100.  This was a charity bottle for the Bourbon Bonanza Benefit 2016. Bottle number 23/109.

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Willett 24yr bourbon 121 proof Barrel No. 9956:
Nice dark golden color.  Nose is closed with hints of baking spices in the background. Great mouthfeel right off the bat, but the flavor isn’t following through. It’s enjoyable but it’s a shame I tried the B79 first, because this has more wood and tannins and just not as interesting. It’s still solid though–I’m not pouring it out. 92/100

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The Hits Just Keep on Coming… Barrell Bourbon Batch 012

Batch 12 is the most recent release from Barrell Bourbon, just off the heels of their best Bourbon of the year award from San Francisco Ultimate Spirits (http://www.fredminnick.com/2017/04/27/shocking-whiskey-upsets-17-san-fran-world-spirits-comp/). I also was a huge fan of Batch 011 (link). I think I have a future as a spirits judge…

Batch 12 is quite a bit older than 11 coming in at 9 years, but is lower proof, 108.5. I’m not sure, but this might be the lowest proof they have ever released.

The nose on this one is completely different than any previous batch I have tried. This one is a complete fruit bomb: plums, dried cherries, orange peel, hints of graham cracker and brioche. Very little heat on the nose.

Great oils and tannins on the mouthfeel with a wonderful spiciness I didn’t get first on the nose. Getting the fruit and more on the palate. Warmer than expected, in a good way.  The finish is at least two minutes long.

This is a really solid follow up to Batch 011. While most of the stores I go to have sold out of Batch 011, if you buy 012, you won’t be disappointed. It might be enjoyed even more by people who don’t like their Bourbon at 135 proof–probably is more approachable to most whiskey consumers. 94/100.

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https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2017/04/25/newest-barrell-bourbon-batch-is-a-home-run-011/

https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2017/05/14/barrell-bourbon-batch-10/

http://www.barrellbourbon.com/

http://www.barrellbourbon.com/bourbonbatches

Rum Curious by Fred Minnick

Before I start, let me say that I will not be switching to rum going forward–I will maintain my love and long-term devotion to Bourbon, but, as you know from some of my previous blogs, I may temporarily stray from time to time to other spirits including rum.  Everyone enjoys a little strange now and then…

Fred Minnick is a world famous whiskey journalist, in addition to being one of the best spirits judges out there.  He judges at the San Francisco Ultimate Spirits competition, and it seems that every Whiskey magazine I open, he is rating and reviewing whiskey and other spirits in them as well.  I have read all of his previous books, most recently Bourbon Curious, which is another one I highly recommend.

Perfect for summer reading, Minnick covers the history, production and regulations of Rum before jumping into the tasting and reviews.  It was a nice vacation from reading about everyone repeating what Bottled in Bond is or the requirements for a Bourbon Whiskey.  Rum has an interesting history, steeped in the evolution of the United States as a country.  One could argue that it was more important building the foundation of the country than Bourbon was.  Minnick’s writing flows well, is easy to understand, but doesn’t patronize the reader.

The reviews are interesting and educational with humor intertwined as well–I especially like when he threatens anyone making a cocktail out of any rum he rated 95 points or higher.

Father’s Day is right around the corner, and for the Bourbon lover who already owns all the books, this is a perfect gift.  https://www.amazon.com/Rum-Curious-Indispensable-Tasting-Worlds/dp/0760351732/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496021889&sr=8-1&keywords=rum+curious

Below are the links to a couple rums I rated earlier… Fred and I do not agree on our ratings, I thought both were very good, however, he rated the Barrell Rum very well, but lambasted the Balcone’s Rum.  I guess I have a lot more to learn before I’m invited to be a judge at the Ultimate Spirits Competition.  Pick up your book for yourself or for your favorite Father ASAP!

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https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/12/03/barrell-rum-batch-001-7yr-jamaican-pot-still-rum/

https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/balcones-texas-rum-special-release-batch-15-1-63-9-abv/

http://www.barrellbourbon.com/rum

http://fredminnick.com/

 

Jefferson’s Buffalo Trail TTB Request Spurs Excitement, Lawsuits and Curiosity

Jefferson’s Bourbon has just submitted a new TTB request for a very unique new Bourbon: the Jefferson’s Buffalo Trail Bourbon.  Partnering with Ted Turner, the owner of the largest Buffalo herd in North America, Jefferson’s has developed a unique proprietary saddle that will attach two 10 gallon barrels to an adult buffalo, part of Turner’s Buffalo herd, as they migrate across the Montana Buffalo Trail.

Turner said, “When Trey (Zoeller) approached me about this unique opportunity to involve my herd in one of my favorite other passions, Bourbon, how could I not gallop at the opportunity?” Trey Zoeller, founder of Jefferson’s Bourbon, is always looking to push the envelope of new aging techniques after developing Jefferson’s Ocean.  Zoeller commented that he “was extremely excited about Turner’s enthusiasm for the joint venture to create a unique Bourbon product.  We hope power, American Spirit and wooliness of the American Buffalo will transferred into the barrels in the saddle for the public to enjoy.”

However, not everyone is excited for this new product.  A representative from the ASPCA commented that they were very concerned for the welfare of the Buffalo involved and believed the saddle to hold the Bourbon barrels constituted animal cruelty: “how would you like to have two full whiskey barrels strapped to you during a 500 mile journey!”

In addition to the ASPCA, an unnamed source at a Louisville, KY based law firm leaked to the press that Sazerac Co. is preparing to file suit against Zoeller and Jefferson’s for trademark infringement because it is too close to their Buffalo Trace brand.  When asked for comment, Zoeller said “tell Goldring to bring his best, because as far as I know, he doesn’t have any real Buffalo involved in his brand, and we do.  If he wants to sue us too, he can see me in court!”

Zoeller says he will partner with select retailers to product a cask strength single barrel limited release version in two years if the first trail run is successful, but for the Fall they will be releasing an expected 4,000-5,000 barrels of the Jefferson’s Buffalo Trail #1 at 100 proof, non-chill filtered.  We at newbourbondrinker are looking forward to trying the new expression and would love to try a sample when it is available.

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Widow Jane Whiskey Distilled from Rye Mash: BOLD FACED LIARS

I have to say, this is one of the least attractive bottles I’ve ever seen.  Don’t judge a book by its cover…. they say, and because I’ve never tried anything from Widow Jane, let us just hope that the worst part is the visual.  The liquid in the bottle is super hazy, with weird clouds of nebulous clumps floating around, in addition to a touch of charcoal dust at the bottom–I really do like the dust.  There is a sticker they attached to the top of the bottle that says: “new technique, blah blah blah.”  Here is where I have a problem. This sticker, is a bold faced lie.  They claim they have a new technique of non-chill filtering that causes this issue?  No.  This is a very old issue that every distillery encounters.  Distillers that choose to proof their whiskey down well below 100 proof (this one is 91), are faced with cloudiness in their bourbon due to the way water interacts with the liquid.  So if a distillery wants to non-chill filter (which I’m so glad so many do!) they usually sell it at a cask strength, or at least a bottled-in-bond style.  At this proof, the liquid is clear and beautiful.  Once you get to 91, it clouds up so you would have to chill filter to remove those elements to make it look attractive.  So again, saying that it is a new technique, is just a bold faced lie.  The question is whether or not, even with the weird asthetic choice, proofing down a non-chill filtered young rye whiskey to 91 proof is the right decision from a taste perspective.  I’m willing to forgive the ugliness of the rye if the taste makes up for it.

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Spoiler Alert… it didn’t.  The nose is moderately hot, medicinal, soapy, full of cough syrup, menthol, with hints of rock candy, eucaliptis and mint.  Not particularly inviting at all.

The taste echoes the nose with heat first and foremost, with unexciting flavors that go into a short finish dominated by more heat.  The mouthfeel is the other redeeming aspect of this rye which is due to the non-chill filtered, as you get some nice grippy tannins.  Unfortunately this doesn’t salvage the dram.

I did a little research online and here is what I think happened…  No where on this bottle does it mention where this whiskey was distilled (is that still legal in this day and age?), and I heard they source it from somewhere in Kentucky.  My bet is that this is barely two years old from the new Willett rye production.  They ship it up to Brooklyn, and no, not everything is cooler and better in Brooklyn.  They probably move it into different barrels they had in the distillery so they can say they finished it in New York.  Then they bring a few barrels of water from their eponymous source upstate, and use it to proof down.  They probably wanted to bottle this at 100 or higher proof, but the heat is so bad, and they didn’t feel like waiting for the rye to mellow, that they felt they had to release it at the lower proof.  Putting a sticker at the top of a label in certain states is legal, not requiring TTB approval, so they stuck it on after the fact once they realized that it wasn’t selling because of the cloudiness.  These are all educated guesses, but I’m willing to bet that they are pretty close to the truth.  Ultimately, Widow Jane should be embarrassed to put this product out with a label that is a lie, and with a product that isn’t very good.  I’m relieved to say that I didn’t buy this bottle, instead my wife received it as a work gift from one of the law firms that her firm works with.  I guess they don’t care too much about her business, otherwise they wouldn’t have sent such a shit gift.  I can’t believe anyone would pay anything for this awful “craft” whiskey, let alone the $50 MSRP.  73/100

Top 5 Disappointments of 2016 in Bourbon

Age statements going away… prices going up… there is just so much to complain about, but I would argue there is so much more to celebrate.  So please check out my top 5 drams of the year (my review) first because I do believe 2016 was a great year in bourbon.  But here are my complaints….

#1 Retailers charging more than secondary prices… it’s a huge pain in the butt and here are the ones that I found to be most obnoxious:

#2 Your favorite low cost bourbon going away… whether it was going NAS for some, but for me it was losing OGD114.  However… I called up my local retail store, took down two cases, so I now have more than 24 bottles in the bunker which should last me quite enough time 🙂

#3  Trying some really terrible new craft stuff… 99% of the time when you are at a farmers market and someone has some small batch, small barrel, new whiskey they are excited about from some local farm with locally sourced grain, it’s horrible.  There are too many to cite, but they are almost all bad (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/orange-county-distillery-back-to-the-drawing-board-please/)

#4 Diageo and their never ending cash grab… latest example was Whoop & Holler which should have been used as an industrial cleaner… it was literally not worth drinking.  There was some whiskey writer who put it on his top whiskeys of the year… I tweeted that guy directly, and I’m not sure he even knows what bourbon is. (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/11/26/orphan-barrel-whoop-holler/)

#5 Willett’s new make 3yr rye.  I love Willett products, but this was just terrible.  I’m really hoping it was a one off and will get better, but this was just disappointing. (https://newbourbondrinker.wordpress.com/2016/09/29/3yr-rye-distilled-aged-bottled-by-the-willett-distillery/)

Again… this is just my top 5…  a few things barely missed the cut, most specifically the Knob Creek 2001: put it in a wooden box, call it limited release and 3x the price?  Seriously?  I hear they are already over 60k bottles, and to be honest, I’ve yet to have one that I like.  I’d love to hear from my readers what their biggest disappointment was and what they are most excited for in 2017!

Happy New Year Barrell Bourbon 2017

Happy New Year!  This is the inaugural release of Barrell Bourbon’s New Year bourbon, a once a year release based on a blend of multiple barrels from multiple ages, specially picked by Joe Beatrice and the Barrell Bourbon team to come up with what they believe to be an epic marriage.  I did a little research and discovered there are 5yr, 8yr, 9yr, 10yr and 13yr barrels in this blend from Kentucky, Tennessee and Indiana.

The nose is incredibly sweet with candy corn, Kit Kat, Reese’s Pieces, Peanut Butter M&M’s and fresh french toast topped with fresh butter and maple syrup.  Again, in classic Barrell Bourbon fashion, the nose is not hot at all which is unbelievable for a 117 proof.

What a blend!  The taste is so good, encompassing all the flavors from the nose, with the Peanut Butter M&M’s coming through the most.  The gentle warmth is enjoyable, while the finish is long.

I think Barrell Bourbon New Year is the start of something special, and if you are lucky enough to find a bottle on the shelf, run to grab it, do not hesitate.  I have a feeling this is going to be one of of the most anticipated releases of the year for many years to come… I wouldn’t be shocked if this showed up on bottle-spot.com at 2x retail very quickly.  97/100.

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